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Android Lego NXT Rover with Stereoscopic Vision








This is a Lego NXT rover I built. It has independent suspension and enough torque to climb over the annoying threshold trim in every doorway of my apartment. It carries two Android G1s that will eventually provide stereoscopic vision and remote control via Wifi. Currently, it's remotely controlled by my Nexus One via Bluetooth.

I experimented a bit with adding four wheel steering, but it got rather complex. Skid steering works well enough for now. If the software side of things works out well, I may replace the wheels with some omni-wheels in the future.

I have some ideas for the stereoscopic vision. Mostly I'm interested in having a 3D remote viewing experience. For that, I'll need some sort of viewer.

I will also have to solve the charging problem. I'll probably start with the NXT Li-Ion pack. Then I'll have to build a dock.

All in all, this project is just getting started. But, I'm excited to have a robotic platform that has full mobility in my apartment. Also, the integration of Android will make development easier.

Check out the video below to see it climbing over one of those dastardly threshold trim pieces.

Comments

  1. Nicely done Damon! How hard was the lego assembly? Seems like a reasonably Roomba alternative.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks!

    I'd say it's a bit far from being a real alternative to the iRobot Create. The Create is very powerful. However, the Create couldn't climb my thresholds and the Legos are a lot more flexible.

    The assembly was challenging, but fun. It's difficult to build something sturdy and powerful without a good deal of experimentation. I've been playing with different designs for about a year now. Until recently though, I was trying to build something that would carry the OLPC. Since I got Bluetooth to NXT communication working though, I've abandoned the OLPC for Android.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Great job making an impressive NXT Robot. This year for the Intel ISEF my project was "Creation of a 3D Environment with Binocular Vision", and I'd be more than happy to send some of my code over to you. Unfortunately, though, it was written with the Arduino IDE and Processing IDE which are both based on the C (or C++; I can't remember), but I'm sure you could figure out how to implement it into the Android Scripting Environment.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Neat! I have some friends at this years ISEF. Is your code open sourced some place?

    ReplyDelete
  5. Not exactly yet (I'm working on posting the code online), but I'd still be happy to send it to you through email.

    ReplyDelete

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